Charminar in the 1880’s

The Charminar, built in 1591 AD, is as much the signature of Hyderabad as the Taj Mahal is of Agra or the Eiffel Tower is of Paris.

The English name is a transliteration and combination of the Urdu words Char and Minar, translating to “Four Towers”; the eponymous towers are ornate minarets attached and supported by four grand arches.

Read more about the Charminar here

Photo Source: Old Photos

Music-Cow

Cow Parade is the largest public art event in the world. It is an international public art exhibit that has been featured in major cities all over the world. Each Cow Parade features spectacularly designed life-sized fiberglass sculptures of cows that have been decorated by professional and amateur artists from the host city.

The famed Cow Parade event is all about offering public access to thought-provoking, stimulating art in an urban environment. The cows are distributed over the city centre in public places such as train stations, important avenues, and parks of the host city

The first Cow Parade event was held in Zurich in 1998, and since then over 70 destinations such as Paris, Tokyo, London and New York have participated on all continents with over 6,000 artists and 5,000 cows. Now the artistic endeavours of the life-sized Cow Parade are available in a series of miniature, highly collectible sculptures.

This collection features hand-painted replicas of the cows that have participated in the Cow Parade events around the world. Each Cow Parade cow has its own story to tell and makes a Cow Parade cow a wonderful gift to give and to receive. Get moo-ving and start your colourful Cow Parade collection today!
This piece will add a fun and quirky touch to any space.
Porto Alegre, Brazil 2010 – 2011

Buy the Music-Cow on Brands Exclusive

Chi Udaka

Reblogged from Sydney Festival 2014 :

TAIKOZ AND LINGALAYAM | AUSTRALIA WORLD PREMIERE

The powerful drumming of TaikOz merges with the intricate classical Indian dance movements of Lingalayam. The vocabulary of both companies is steeped in history and tradition and they now come together with their respective Japanese and Indian practices to break new ground.

Inspired by the forces of nature, Chi Udaka is a meeting of the deep earthiness of taiko drumming (Chi – earth) and the flowing sensuality of dance (Udaka – water). At turns delicate and dramatic, it unites the taiko drums of TaikOz, the shakuhachi flute of Riley Lee, cello and classical Indian vocals with Lingalayam’s blend of Bharatha Natyam and Kuchipudi dance forms.

A dynamic, cross-cultural partnership, Chi Udaka has its world premiere at Seymour Centre.

Presented by Seymour Centre in association with Sydney Festival

Meet Aishwarya

Aishwarya Balasubramanian (previously Aishwarya Narayanaswamy) is one of Chennai’s most popular Bharathnatyam dancers and the senior most student of renowned Guru Acharya Choodamani Smt. Anitha Guha.

Aishwarya Balasubramanian began her career early, as a five year old student and performer at Anitha Guha’s Bharathanjali, stunning audiences with her amazing grace, clarity of footwork and beauty of expression.

Over the years, with intense training, inherent commitment and a rigorous discipline, Aishwarya has evolved into a much sought after performing artiste, presenting across cultural organizations in India and overseas at premier dance festivals and prominent sabhas.

It is her precise technique; unending energy and flawless movements that makes Aishwarya shine in central roles in Bharatanjali’s dance ballets and thematic presentations. Rasikas are often thrilled by her sculpted poses and depth of abhinaya.

Titles like “Singar Mani”, “Nalanda Nritya Nipuna”, “Natya Chudar” that have been bestowed on Aishwarya are not just a reflection of her astonishing potential and promise but an acknowledgement of a dancer who leads her generation by setting exacting standards.

Marriage or child hasn’t come in Aishwarya’s way as she has now deeply engaged herself in not just performances but choreography, nattuvangam, music, theory of dance and teaching, while continuing to focus on the margam. “I feel happiest when I am dancing. Each performance deserves my best and I try to give it!”, says Aishwarya.

See more here